Room: Seminar Room A/B Host: MPI for Medical Research

Self-Presentation in Science and Everyday Life – Presenting Yourself Convincingly

Self-Presentation in Science and Everyday Life – Presenting Yourself Convincingly
Workshop for staff members. [more]

Rudolf Mößbauer Colloquium with Benny Geiger (Weizmann Institute of Science)

Rudolf Mößbauer Colloquium with Benny Geiger (Weizmann Institute of Science)
Multi-scale view of cell adhesion-mediated mechanosensitivity: From mollecules to cells to tissues [more]

Rudolf Mößbauer Colloquium with Gideon Schreiber (Weizmann Institute of Science)

Rudolf Mößbauer Colloquium with Gideon Schreiber (Weizmann Institute of Science)
Normal and Attenuated Diffusion in the Cell and its effect on protein Activity: Biochemistry traditionally determines protein-activity in dilute solutions, while their native environment is the densely populated cytoplasm of the living cell. The environment of the cytoplasm is very different from the test tube in its composition and crowding. This results in potential hard and soft interactions, which may affect diffusion and binding. In my talk I will provide experimental evidence on how these interactions affect catalytic activity and protein-protein interactions. For catalytic activity we found that in vivo catalytic efficiency varied between cells and was much lower than in vitro. Simulations and experiments showed that the attenuated diffusion of the substrate related to the reduced apparent enzyme activity in the cell. For protein-protein interactions we followed both structured and natively unfolded proteins in the cell. Here, we found the cellular environment to have a more limited effect on binding. We suggest that this is a result of proteins having evolved to balance between binding desired partners while rejecting others, achieving fast and specific interactions. Indeed, we show that very few mutations are required to evolve new bind partners, which may effect homeostasis in the cell. [more]

Rudolf Mößbauer Colloquium with Jean-Marie Lehn (ISIS, Universite de Strasbourg)

Rudolf Mößbauer Colloquium with Jean-Marie Lehn (ISIS, Universite de Strasbourg)
From Supramolecular Chemistry towards Adaptive Chemistry Perspectives in Chemistry: Supramolecular chemistry lies beyond molecular chemistry and aims at generating highly complex chemical systems from molecular components held together by non-covalent intermolecular forces, on the basis of the molecular information stored in the covalent framework of the components. A step beyond consists in the design of systems undergoing self-organization, i.e. systems capable of spontaneously generating well-defined functional architectures by self-assembly from their components. Supramolecular chemistry is intrinsically a dynamic chemistry due to the lability of the interactions connecting the molecular components of a supramolecular entity. The same holds for molecular chemistry when the molecular entity contains covalent bonds that may form and break reversibly. These features allow for a continuous change in constitution by reorganization and exchange of building blocks and define a Constitutional Dynamic Chemistry on both levels. They implement variation and selection leading to the emergence of an adaptive chemistry on the way towards complex matter. References Ø Lehn, J.-M., Supramolecular Chemistry: Concepts and Perspectives, VCH Weinheim, 1995. Ø Lehn, J.-M., Dynamic combinatorial chemistry and virtual combinatorial libraries, Chem. Eur. J., 1999, 5, 2455. Ø Lehn, J.-M., Toward complex matter: Supramolecular chemistry and self-organization, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA, 2002, 99, 4763. Ø Lehn, J.-M., From supramolecular chemistry towards constitutional dynamic chemistry and adaptive chemistry, Chem. Soc. Rev., 2007, 36, 151. Ø Lehn, J.-M., Chapter 1, in Constitutional Dynamic Chemistry, ed. M. Barboiu, Topics Curr. Chem, 2012, 322, 1-32. Ø Lehn, J.-M., Perspectives in Chemistry – Steps towards Complex Matter, Angew. Chem. Int. Ed., 2013, 52, 2836-2850. Ø Lehn, J.-M., Perspectives in Chemistry – Aspects of Adaptive Chemistry and Materials, Angew. Chem. Int. Ed., 2015, 54, 3276-3289. [more]

Bioimaging Seminar with Holger Lorenz (ZMBH)

Bioimaging Seminar with Holger Lorenz (ZMBH)

Rudolf Mößbauer Colloquium with Steven Benner (FfAME) - Synthesizing Darwinism from the Bottom Up

Rudolf Mößbauer Colloquium with Steven Benner (FfAME) - Synthesizing Darwinism from the Bottom Up
Title: Synthesizing Darwinism from the Bottom Up Abstract: By pursuing a “grand challenge” goal, synthesis forces scientists across uncharted terrain where they encounter unscripted problems that they must solve using available theory. When the theory is inadequate, the synthesis fails, in a way that cannot be ignored. Thus, grand challenge synthesis drives discovery and paradigm change in ways that observation, analysis, and hypothesis-directed work cannot. This talk will describe our efforts to re-create Darwinism, the archetypal behavior that distinguishes the living state from the nonliving state. It will focus on discoveries and understanding that emerged as we attempted to re-create this central property of living systems on a molecular platform different from what prebiotic chemistry and natural evolution over 4 billion years have produced on Earth. [more]

Rudolf Mößbauer Colloquium with Barbara Imperiali (MIT) - Protein glycosylation: pathways and processes

Rudolf Mößbauer Colloquium with Barbara Imperiali (MIT) - Protein glycosylation: pathways and processes
Complex multistep biosynthetic pathways that afford asparagine-linked (N-linked) glycoproteins occur in all domains of life. The extremely varied and critical functions of N-linked glycosylation in mammalian biology makes this process of significant importance in human health and disease and also of great relevance in medicine and biotechnology as protein therapeutics have become important elements in the modern pharmacopoeia. N-linked glycosylation also occurs in prokaryotes, and, although many important details remain to be explored, it is now clear that there are key differences between the pathways and the resultant glycoprotein functions relative to the well-understood eukaryotic processes. For example, prokaryotic N-linked glycoproteins integrate a far greater diversity of carbohydrate building blocks and glycosidic linkages, relative to their eukaryotic counterparts. Therefore, there is considerable interest the development of chemical biology tools to provide insight into this phenomenon and its functional consequences. In this context, bacterial glycoproteins produced through membrane-associated pathways are implicated in host-pathogen interactions and are displayed on bacterial cell surfaces as virulence factors. Additionally, while multistep N-linked protein glycosylation pathways characterized to date feature glycan assembly at the bilayer interface on linear polyprenol phosphates, there are intriguing differences in the identities of the polyprenols and the physical and biological roles of these unusual terpenes. This presentation will discuss themes reflected in our current research on N-linked protein glycosylation. I will compare and contrast the structures and functions of key enzymes in the N-glycosylation pathways across domains of life and highlight enzymatic steps in Gram-negative pathogens that are critical for virulence and pathogenicity in human hosts. In addition, I will present approaches for investigation of multienzyme complexes in liponanoparticles ultimately targeted at understanding the role of lipids in protein-protein interactions at membrane interfaces. [more]

Open Lecture with Simon Moroney (Former CEO of MorphoSys), The MorphoSys Story: From Concept to Fully-integrated Biopharma Company

Open Lecture with Simon Moroney (Former CEO of MorphoSys), The MorphoSys Story: From Concept to Fully-integrated Biopharma Company
Dr. Moroney is one of the Company’s co-founders. Prior to that, Dr. Moroney held positions in the Department of Pharmacology, University of Cambridge, UK, as Assistant Professor in the Chemistry Department of the University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada, and as Associate in the Chemistry Department of the ETH in Zurich, Switzerland, where he also held a position as Lecturer. He was an Associate in the Harvard Medical School, Boston, USA, and an employee of ImmunoGen Inc., where he worked on the first generation of anti-cancer antibody conjugates. Dr. Moroney studied chemistry in his native New Zealand, where he completed an MSc with 1st class honors and was a Commonwealth Scholar to the University of Oxford, where he was awarded a D.Phil. in Chemistry. In 2002, Dr. Moroney received the German Cross of the Order of Merit by Dr. Johannes Rau, President of the Federal Republic of Germany, for his services to the biotechnology industry. In 2009, Dr. Moroney was awarded with the Bavarian State Medal for Outstanding Services for his contributions to the Bavarian biotechnology sector and the Bavarian economy. [more]

CANCELLED: Rudolf Mößbauer Colloquium with Prisca Liberali (FMI for Biomedical Research)

Rudolf Mößbauer Colloquium with Prisca Liberali (FMI for Biomedical Research)

Rudolf Mößbauer Colloquium with Pablo Rivera Fuentes (EPFL) on 'Molecular switches for single-molecule imaging in live cells'

Rudolf Mößbauer Colloquium with Pablo Rivera Fuentes (EPFL) on 'Molecular switches for single-molecule imaging in live cells'

CANCELLED - Rudolf Mößbauer Colloquium with Theresa Guise (Indiana University)

CANCELLED - Rudolf Mößbauer Colloquium with Theresa Guise (Indiana University)

Rudolf Mößbauer Colloquium with Dan S. Tawfik (Weizmann Institute of Science)

Rudolf Mößbauer Colloquium with Dan S. Tawfik (Weizmann Institute of Science)

90 Jahre MPI für medizinische Forschung - Institutsjubiläum

90 Jahre MPI für medizinische Forschung - Institutsjubiläum

Rudolf Mößbauer Colloquium with Young-Tae Chang (POSTECH)

Rudolf Mößbauer Colloquium with Young-Tae Chang (POSTECH)

Meyerhof Lecture with Jason Chin (MRC, Cambridge) - MOVED to October 4th, 2021

Meyerhof Lecture with Jason Chin (MRC, Cambridge) - MOVED to October 4th, 2021

Open Rudolf Mößbauer Colloquium with Ben Schuler (UZH) -Virtual Format

Open Rudolf Mößbauer Colloquium with Ben Schuler (UZH) -Virtual Format
Registration is needed via: https://us02web.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_EvffoGObR-qB1FqFaKnxqA [more]
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