Self-Presentation in Science and Everyday Life – Presenting Yourself Convincingly

Self-Presentation in Science and Everyday Life – Presenting Yourself Convincingly
Workshop for staff members. [more]

BMM Seminar with Michael Heymann - Nano 3D printed microfluidics to understand biological dynamics across scales

BMM Seminar with Michael Heymann - Nano 3D printed microfluidics to understand biological dynamics across scales

Enabling Innovation with the Max Planck Innovation GmbH

Enabling Innovation with the Max Planck Innovation GmbH

Workshop with IDEA Bio-Medical - Automated Microscopy

Workshop with IDEA Bio-Medical - Automated Microscopy

Leading Teams in Academia: Multiple Perspectives for Greater Awareness

Leading Teams in Academia: Multiple Perspectives for Greater Awareness
Workshop for staff members. [more]
14868 1541584515

CB Seminar with Martin Distel (Children's Cancer Research Institute)

CB Seminar with Martin Distel (Children's Cancer Research Institute)
Title of the talk: Modeling Cancer in Zebrafish – current strategies and novel tools [more]
14862 1542971771

Rudolf Mößbauer Colloquium with Benny Geiger (Weizmann Institute of Science)

Rudolf Mößbauer Colloquium with Benny Geiger (Weizmann Institute of Science)
Multi-scale view of cell adhesion-mediated mechanosensitivity: From mollecules to cells to tissues [more]

Strategic Planning of Research Careers (Postdoc Workshop)

Strategic Planning of Research Careers (Postdoc Workshop)
Workshop for staff members. [more]

December PhD/Postdoc Seminar

December PhD/Postdoc Seminar
16109 1543829392

CB Seminar with Thomas Carell (LMU München)

CB Seminar with Thomas Carell (LMU München)
Title: DNA Bases beyond Watson and Crick T. Carell, Center for Integrative Protein Science at the Department of Chemistry, Ludwig Maximilians University, Munich, Butenandtstr. 5-13, 81377; e-mail: thomas.carell@lmu.de; www.carellgroup.de Keywords: Epigenetics, oxidized pyrimidine bases, mass spectrometry, proteomics. Abstract: Epigenetic information is stored in the form of modified bases in the genome. The positions and the kind of the base modifications determines the identity of the corresponding cell. Setting and erasing of epigenetic imprints controls the complete development process starting from an omnipotent stem cells and ending with an adult specialized cell. I am going to discuss results related to the function and distribution of the new epigenetic bases 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (hmC), 5-formylcytosine (fC), 5-carboxycytosine (caC) and 5-hydroxymethyluracil (Scheme 1).[1] These nucleobases seem to control epigenetic programming of cells and establish genetic programmability. Synthetic routes to these new bases will be discussed that enable the preparation of oligonucleotides. The second part of the lecture will cover mass spectroscopic approaches to decipher the biological functions of the new bases.[2] In particular, results from quantitative mass spectrometry, new covalent-capture proteomics mass spectrometry and isotope tracing techniques will be reported.[3] Finally I am dicussing potential präbiotic origins of modified bases[4]. [more]

CBP Seminar with C. Nadir Kaplan (Harvard University)

CBP Seminar with C. Nadir Kaplan (Harvard University)
Title: Theoretical design of hard and soft biomimetic materialsTheoretical design of hard and soft biomimetic materialsC. Nadir KaplanPaulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Harvard UniversityRealizing next-generation materials with intricate shapes or complex signal processing abilities to perform adaptive functions greatly benefits inspiration from biological systems. In the first part of this talk, I will present a geometrical theory that explains the growth and form of carbonate-silica precipitates, which exemplify biomineralization-inspired formation of inorganic brittle microarchitectures. The theory predicts new assembly pathways of arbitrarily complex morphologies and thereby guides the synthesis of light-guiding optical structures. The second part will concern a soft matter analog of information storage and differentiation in living organisms, which constantly process dynamic environmental signals. Specifically, I will introduce a continuum framework of a hydrogel system that utilizes unique cascades of mechanical responses, transport and complexation of chemical stimuli to expand the sensing repertoire beyond standard hydrogels that rapidly equilibrate to their surroundings. Altogether, the confluence of theory and experiment enables the design of optimized hard or soft biomimetic materials for applications ranging from bottom-up manufacturing to soft robotics to data encoding. [more]

Rudolf Mößbauer Colloquium with Gideon Schreiber (Weizmann Institute of Science)

Rudolf Mößbauer Colloquium with Gideon Schreiber (Weizmann Institute of Science)
Normal and Attenuated Diffusion in the Cell and its effect on protein Activity: Biochemistry traditionally determines protein-activity in dilute solutions, while their native environment is the densely populated cytoplasm of the living cell. The environment of the cytoplasm is very different from the test tube in its composition and crowding. This results in potential hard and soft interactions, which may affect diffusion and binding. In my talk I will provide experimental evidence on how these interactions affect catalytic activity and protein-protein interactions. For catalytic activity we found that in vivo catalytic efficiency varied between cells and was much lower than in vitro. Simulations and experiments showed that the attenuated diffusion of the substrate related to the reduced apparent enzyme activity in the cell. For protein-protein interactions we followed both structured and natively unfolded proteins in the cell. Here, we found the cellular environment to have a more limited effect on binding. We suggest that this is a result of proteins having evolved to balance between binding desired partners while rejecting others, achieving fast and specific interactions. Indeed, we show that very few mutations are required to evolve new bind partners, which may effect homeostasis in the cell. [more]

CBP/ON Seminar with Fulvio Chiacchiera (IEO)

CBP/ON Seminar with Fulvio Chiacchiera (IEO)
Title: Polycomb activities preserving stem cell identity and tissue homeostasis [more]

Rudolf Mößbauer Colloquium with Jean-Marie Lehn (ISIS, Universite de Strasbourg)

Rudolf Mößbauer Colloquium with Jean-Marie Lehn (ISIS, Universite de Strasbourg)
From Supramolecular Chemistry towards Adaptive Chemistry Perspectives in Chemistry: Supramolecular chemistry lies beyond molecular chemistry and aims at generating highly complex chemical systems from molecular components held together by non-covalent intermolecular forces, on the basis of the molecular information stored in the covalent framework of the components. A step beyond consists in the design of systems undergoing self-organization, i.e. systems capable of spontaneously generating well-defined functional architectures by self-assembly from their components. Supramolecular chemistry is intrinsically a dynamic chemistry due to the lability of the interactions connecting the molecular components of a supramolecular entity. The same holds for molecular chemistry when the molecular entity contains covalent bonds that may form and break reversibly. These features allow for a continuous change in constitution by reorganization and exchange of building blocks and define a Constitutional Dynamic Chemistry on both levels. They implement variation and selection leading to the emergence of an adaptive chemistry on the way towards complex matter. References Ø Lehn, J.-M., Supramolecular Chemistry: Concepts and Perspectives, VCH Weinheim, 1995. Ø Lehn, J.-M., Dynamic combinatorial chemistry and virtual combinatorial libraries, Chem. Eur. J., 1999, 5, 2455. Ø Lehn, J.-M., Toward complex matter: Supramolecular chemistry and self-organization, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA, 2002, 99, 4763. Ø Lehn, J.-M., From supramolecular chemistry towards constitutional dynamic chemistry and adaptive chemistry, Chem. Soc. Rev., 2007, 36, 151. Ø Lehn, J.-M., Chapter 1, in Constitutional Dynamic Chemistry, ed. M. Barboiu, Topics Curr. Chem, 2012, 322, 1-32. Ø Lehn, J.-M., Perspectives in Chemistry – Steps towards Complex Matter, Angew. Chem. Int. Ed., 2013, 52, 2836-2850. Ø Lehn, J.-M., Perspectives in Chemistry – Aspects of Adaptive Chemistry and Materials, Angew. Chem. Int. Ed., 2015, 54, 3276-3289. [more]

February PhD/Postdoc Seminar with Jan Ellenberg (EMBL)

February PhD/Postdoc Seminar with Jan Ellenberg (EMBL)

March PhD/Postdoc Seminar

March PhD/Postdoc Seminar
17517 1548673258
Eine Anmeldung für den Girls' und Boys' Day 2019 ist hier möglich: https://www.heidelberg.de/hd,Lde/HD/Rathaus/Girls_+und+Boys_+Day+2015.html#girls-day-angebote-2019 [more]

April PhD/Postdoc Seminar

April PhD/Postdoc Seminar

Rudolf Mößbauer Colloquium with Avi Schroeder (TECHNION)

Rudolf Mößbauer Colloquium with Avi Schroeder (TECHNION)

May PhD/Postdoc Seminar

May PhD/Postdoc Seminar

Negotiation Skills for Scientists (Workshop)

Negotiation Skills for Scientists (Workshop)

Rudolf Mößbauer Colloquium with Seung-Wuk Lee (UC Berkeley)

Rudolf Mößbauer Colloquium with Seung-Wuk Lee (UC Berkeley)
Bio-inspired Material Assembly and Applications Abstract In nature, helical macromolecules such as collagen, chitin and cellulose are critical to the morphogenesis and functionality of various hierarchically structured materials. During morphogenesis, these chiral macromolecules are secreted and undergo self-templating assembly, a process whereby multiple kinetic factors influence the assembly of the incoming building blocks to produce non-equilibrium structures. A single macromolecule can form diverse functional structures when self-templated under different conditions. Collagen type I, for instance, forms transparent corneal tissues from orthogonally aligned nematic fibers, distinctively colored skin tissues from cholesteric phase fiber bundles, and mineralized tissues from hierarchically organized fibers. Nature’s self-templated materials surpass the functional and structural complexity achievable by current top-down and bottom-up fabrication methods. However, self-templating has not been thoroughly explored for engineering synthetic materials. In my seminar, I will demonstrate a facile biomimetic process to create functional nanomaterials utilizing chiral colloidal particles (M13 phage). A single-step process produces long-range-ordered, supramolecular films showing multiple levels of hierarchical organization and helical twist. Using the self-templating materials assembly processes, we have created various biomimetic supramolecular structures. The resulting materials show distinctive optical and photonic properties, functioning as chiral reflector/filters and structural color matrices. Through the directed evolution of the M13 phages, I will also show how resulting materials can be utilized as functional nanomaterials for biomedical, biosensor and bioenergy applications1-3. References: Chung, W.-J., Oh, J.-W., Kwak, K.-W., Lee, B.-Y., Mayer, J., Wang, E., Hexemer, A., & Lee, S.-W. Biomimetic Self-Templating Supramolecular Structures. Nature 478, 364 (2011).Lee, B.-Y., Zheng, J., Zueger, C., Chung, W.-J., Yoo, S.-Y., Wang, E., Meyer, J., Ramesh, R., Lee, S.-W., Virus-based Piezoelectric Energy Generation. Nature Nanotechnology. 7, 351 (2012).Oh, J.-W., Chung, W.-J., Heo, K, Jin, H.-E., Lee, B.-Y., Wang E., Meyer, J., Kim C., Lee, S.-Y., Kim, W.-G., Zemla, M, Auer, M , Hexemer, A, and Lee, S.-W., Biomimetic Virus-Based Colourimetric Sensors, Nature Communication 5, Article number: 3043 (2014). [more]

May PhD and Postdoc seminar

May PhD and Postdoc seminar
18816 1558431625

Bioimaging Seminar with Holger Lorenz (ZMBH)

Bioimaging Seminar with Holger Lorenz (ZMBH)

July PhD and Postdoc Seminar

July PhD and Postdoc Seminar
20183 1567599370

Rudolf Mößbauer Colloquium with Paul Nealey (University of Chicago)

Rudolf Mößbauer Colloquium with Paul Nealey (University of Chicago)
Ion transport in block copolymer electrolytesIon conducting polymers play a central role in the development of safer and more efficient electrochemical devices such as batteries, fuel cells, and electrolyzers. Self-assembling polymeric materials with multiple components offer pathways to simultaneously optimize more than one material function, as well as control structure at the nanoscale. In the first part of my talk, I will highlight the advantages and new information that can be derived from the use of custom microfabricated interdigitated electrodes (IDEs) as a platform to probe extrinsic and intrinsic transport properties of polymer electrolytes films through electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The second part of my talk will address the use block copolymer electrolytes (BCEs) as ion conducting membranes. BCEs provide the means to realize high ionic conductivity and mechanical robustness by judicious choice of block chemistry. To understand the potential of these materials, however, transport properties through BCEs, with domain structure at the nanoscale, must be understood at a fundamental level at the device scale, 10s to 100s of microns. Extrinsic properties of BCEs depend strongly on the presence of grain boundaries and defects. Conductivity is found to be directly proportional to the number and length of domains of the BCE that are connected from one electrode to the other. Any conducting domain within the film impeded with even a single non-conducting defect (e.g. a dislocation) does not contribute to the conductivity and increases the capacitance of the material. Finally, by completely aligning and connecting the conductive domains between electrodes, we can quantitatively investigate the intrinsic transport properties of BCEs and compare them to their homopolymer analogs. We conclude that the interfacial mixing between the blocks at domain interfaces is the dominant factor in reducing ionic mobility in BCEs, reducing the expected conductivity based on volume fraction by as much a factor of 2. [more]

September PhD/Postdoc Seminar

September PhD/Postdoc Seminar

Departmental Seminar with Prof. Dr. Dietmar Hutmacher (QUT)

Departmental Seminar with Prof. Dr. Dietmar Hutmacher (QUT)
Title of the Talk: Humanized Mice Models – State of the Field and Future Perspectives [more]

Proposal Writing (Workshop)

Proposal Writing (Workshop)

Time and Stress Management for Scientists (Workshop)

Time and Stress Management for Scientists (Workshop)

Rudolf Mößbauer Colloquium with Steven Benner (FfAME) - Synthesizing Darwinism from the Bottom Up

Rudolf Mößbauer Colloquium with Steven Benner (FfAME) - Synthesizing Darwinism from the Bottom Up
Title: Synthesizing Darwinism from the Bottom Up Abstract: By pursuing a “grand challenge” goal, synthesis forces scientists across uncharted terrain where they encounter unscripted problems that they must solve using available theory. When the theory is inadequate, the synthesis fails, in a way that cannot be ignored. Thus, grand challenge synthesis drives discovery and paradigm change in ways that observation, analysis, and hypothesis-directed work cannot. This talk will describe our efforts to re-create Darwinism, the archetypal behavior that distinguishes the living state from the nonliving state. It will focus on discoveries and understanding that emerged as we attempted to re-create this central property of living systems on a molecular platform different from what prebiotic chemistry and natural evolution over 4 billion years have produced on Earth. [more]

October PhD/Postdoc Seminar

October PhD/Postdoc Seminar

Rudolf Mößbauer Colloquium with Barbara Imperiali (MIT)

Rudolf Mößbauer Colloquium with Barbara Imperiali (MIT)

Rudolf Mößbauer Colloquium with Andrea Musacchio (MPI of Molecular Physiology)

Rudolf Mößbauer Colloquium with Andrea Musacchio (MPI of Molecular Physiology)

November PhD/Postdoc Seminar with Petra Schwille

November PhD/Postdoc Seminar with Petra Schwille

Rudolf Mößbauer Colloquium with Sarah O'Connor (MPI for Chemical Ecology)

Rudolf Mößbauer Colloquium with Sarah O'Connor (MPI for Chemical Ecology)
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