Self-Presentation in Science and Everyday Life – Presenting Yourself Convincingly

Self-Presentation in Science and Everyday Life – Presenting Yourself Convincingly
Workshop for staff members. [more]

BMM Seminar with Michael Heymann - Nano 3D printed microfluidics to understand biological dynamics across scales

BMM Seminar with Michael Heymann - Nano 3D printed microfluidics to understand biological dynamics across scales

Enabling Innovation with the Max Planck Innovation GmbH

Enabling Innovation with the Max Planck Innovation GmbH

Workshop with IDEA Bio-Medical - Automated Microscopy

Workshop with IDEA Bio-Medical - Automated Microscopy

Leading Teams in Academia: Multiple Perspectives for Greater Awareness

Leading Teams in Academia: Multiple Perspectives for Greater Awareness
Workshop for staff members. [more]

CB Seminar with Martin Distel (Children's Cancer Research Institute)

CB Seminar with Martin Distel (Children's Cancer Research Institute)
Title of the talk: Modeling Cancer in Zebrafish – current strategies and novel tools [more]

Rudolf Mößbauer Colloquium with Benny Geiger (Weizmann Institute of Science)

Rudolf Mößbauer Colloquium with Benny Geiger (Weizmann Institute of Science)
Multi-scale view of cell adhesion-mediated mechanosensitivity: From mollecules to cells to tissues [more]

Strategic Planning of Research Careers (Postdoc Workshop)

Strategic Planning of Research Careers (Postdoc Workshop)
Workshop for staff members. [more]

December PhD/Postdoc Seminar

December PhD/Postdoc Seminar

CB Seminar with Thomas Carell (LMU München)

CB Seminar with Thomas Carell (LMU München)
Title: DNA Bases beyond Watson and Crick T. Carell, Center for Integrative Protein Science at the Department of Chemistry, Ludwig Maximilians University, Munich, Butenandtstr. 5-13, 81377; e-mail: thomas.carell@lmu.de; www.carellgroup.de Keywords: Epigenetics, oxidized pyrimidine bases, mass spectrometry, proteomics. Abstract: Epigenetic information is stored in the form of modified bases in the genome. The positions and the kind of the base modifications determines the identity of the corresponding cell. Setting and erasing of epigenetic imprints controls the complete development process starting from an omnipotent stem cells and ending with an adult specialized cell. I am going to discuss results related to the function and distribution of the new epigenetic bases 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (hmC), 5-formylcytosine (fC), 5-carboxycytosine (caC) and 5-hydroxymethyluracil (Scheme 1).[1] These nucleobases seem to control epigenetic programming of cells and establish genetic programmability. Synthetic routes to these new bases will be discussed that enable the preparation of oligonucleotides. The second part of the lecture will cover mass spectroscopic approaches to decipher the biological functions of the new bases.[2] In particular, results from quantitative mass spectrometry, new covalent-capture proteomics mass spectrometry and isotope tracing techniques will be reported.[3] Finally I am dicussing potential präbiotic origins of modified bases[4]. [more]

CBP Seminar with C. Nadir Kaplan (Harvard University)

CBP Seminar with C. Nadir Kaplan (Harvard University)
Title: Theoretical design of hard and soft biomimetic materialsTheoretical design of hard and soft biomimetic materialsC. Nadir KaplanPaulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Harvard UniversityRealizing next-generation materials with intricate shapes or complex signal processing abilities to perform adaptive functions greatly benefits inspiration from biological systems. In the first part of this talk, I will present a geometrical theory that explains the growth and form of carbonate-silica precipitates, which exemplify biomineralization-inspired formation of inorganic brittle microarchitectures. The theory predicts new assembly pathways of arbitrarily complex morphologies and thereby guides the synthesis of light-guiding optical structures. The second part will concern a soft matter analog of information storage and differentiation in living organisms, which constantly process dynamic environmental signals. Specifically, I will introduce a continuum framework of a hydrogel system that utilizes unique cascades of mechanical responses, transport and complexation of chemical stimuli to expand the sensing repertoire beyond standard hydrogels that rapidly equilibrate to their surroundings. Altogether, the confluence of theory and experiment enables the design of optimized hard or soft biomimetic materials for applications ranging from bottom-up manufacturing to soft robotics to data encoding. [more]

Rudolf Mößbauer Colloquium with Gideon Schreiber (Weizmann Institute of Science)

Rudolf Mößbauer Colloquium with Gideon Schreiber (Weizmann Institute of Science)
Normal and Attenuated Diffusion in the Cell and its effect on protein Activity: Biochemistry traditionally determines protein-activity in dilute solutions, while their native environment is the densely populated cytoplasm of the living cell. The environment of the cytoplasm is very different from the test tube in its composition and crowding. This results in potential hard and soft interactions, which may affect diffusion and binding. In my talk I will provide experimental evidence on how these interactions affect catalytic activity and protein-protein interactions. For catalytic activity we found that in vivo catalytic efficiency varied between cells and was much lower than in vitro. Simulations and experiments showed that the attenuated diffusion of the substrate related to the reduced apparent enzyme activity in the cell. For protein-protein interactions we followed both structured and natively unfolded proteins in the cell. Here, we found the cellular environment to have a more limited effect on binding. We suggest that this is a result of proteins having evolved to balance between binding desired partners while rejecting others, achieving fast and specific interactions. Indeed, we show that very few mutations are required to evolve new bind partners, which may effect homeostasis in the cell. [more]

CBP/ON Seminar with Fulvio Chiacchiera (IEO)

CBP/ON Seminar with Fulvio Chiacchiera (IEO)
Title: Polycomb activities preserving stem cell identity and tissue homeostasis [more]

Rudolf Mößbauer Colloquium with Jean-Marie Lehn (ISIS, Universite de Strasbourg)

Rudolf Mößbauer Colloquium with Jean-Marie Lehn (ISIS, Universite de Strasbourg)
From Supramolecular Chemistry towards Adaptive Chemistry Perspectives in Chemistry: Supramolecular chemistry lies beyond molecular chemistry and aims at generating highly complex chemical systems from molecular components held together by non-covalent intermolecular forces, on the basis of the molecular information stored in the covalent framework of the components. A step beyond consists in the design of systems undergoing self-organization, i.e. systems capable of spontaneously generating well-defined functional architectures by self-assembly from their components. Supramolecular chemistry is intrinsically a dynamic chemistry due to the lability of the interactions connecting the molecular components of a supramolecular entity. The same holds for molecular chemistry when the molecular entity contains covalent bonds that may form and break reversibly. These features allow for a continuous change in constitution by reorganization and exchange of building blocks and define a Constitutional Dynamic Chemistry on both levels. They implement variation and selection leading to the emergence of an adaptive chemistry on the way towards complex matter. References Ø Lehn, J.-M., Supramolecular Chemistry: Concepts and Perspectives, VCH Weinheim, 1995. Ø Lehn, J.-M., Dynamic combinatorial chemistry and virtual combinatorial libraries, Chem. Eur. J., 1999, 5, 2455. Ø Lehn, J.-M., Toward complex matter: Supramolecular chemistry and self-organization, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA, 2002, 99, 4763. Ø Lehn, J.-M., From supramolecular chemistry towards constitutional dynamic chemistry and adaptive chemistry, Chem. Soc. Rev., 2007, 36, 151. Ø Lehn, J.-M., Chapter 1, in Constitutional Dynamic Chemistry, ed. M. Barboiu, Topics Curr. Chem, 2012, 322, 1-32. Ø Lehn, J.-M., Perspectives in Chemistry – Steps towards Complex Matter, Angew. Chem. Int. Ed., 2013, 52, 2836-2850. Ø Lehn, J.-M., Perspectives in Chemistry – Aspects of Adaptive Chemistry and Materials, Angew. Chem. Int. Ed., 2015, 54, 3276-3289. [more]

February PhD/Postdoc Seminar with Jan Ellenberg (EMBL)

February PhD/Postdoc Seminar with Jan Ellenberg (EMBL)

March PhD/Postdoc Seminar

March PhD/Postdoc Seminar
Eine Anmeldung für den Girls' und Boys' Day 2019 ist hier möglich: https://www.heidelberg.de/hd,Lde/HD/Rathaus/Girls_+und+Boys_+Day+2015.html#girls-day-angebote-2019 [more]

April PhD/Postdoc Seminar

April PhD/Postdoc Seminar

Rudolf Mößbauer Colloquium with Avi Schroeder (TECHNION)

Rudolf Mößbauer Colloquium with Avi Schroeder (TECHNION)

May PhD/Postdoc Seminar

May PhD/Postdoc Seminar

Negotiation Skills for Scientists (Workshop)

Negotiation Skills for Scientists (Workshop)

Rudolf Mößbauer Colloquium with Seung-Wuk Lee (UC Berkeley)

Rudolf Mößbauer Colloquium with Seung-Wuk Lee (UC Berkeley)
Bio-inspired Material Assembly and Applications Abstract In nature, helical macromolecules such as collagen, chitin and cellulose are critical to the morphogenesis and functionality of various hierarchically structured materials. During morphogenesis, these chiral macromolecules are secreted and undergo self-templating assembly, a process whereby multiple kinetic factors influence the assembly of the incoming building blocks to produce non-equilibrium structures. A single macromolecule can form diverse functional structures when self-templated under different conditions. Collagen type I, for instance, forms transparent corneal tissues from orthogonally aligned nematic fibers, distinctively colored skin tissues from cholesteric phase fiber bundles, and mineralized tissues from hierarchically organized fibers. Nature’s self-templated materials surpass the functional and structural complexity achievable by current top-down and bottom-up fabrication methods. However, self-templating has not been thoroughly explored for engineering synthetic materials. In my seminar, I will demonstrate a facile biomimetic process to create functional nanomaterials utilizing chiral colloidal particles (M13 phage). A single-step process produces long-range-ordered, supramolecular films showing multiple levels of hierarchical organization and helical twist. Using the self-templating materials assembly processes, we have created various biomimetic supramolecular structures. The resulting materials show distinctive optical and photonic properties, functioning as chiral reflector/filters and structural color matrices. Through the directed evolution of the M13 phages, I will also show how resulting materials can be utilized as functional nanomaterials for biomedical, biosensor and bioenergy applications1-3. References: Chung, W.-J., Oh, J.-W., Kwak, K.-W., Lee, B.-Y., Mayer, J., Wang, E., Hexemer, A., & Lee, S.-W. Biomimetic Self-Templating Supramolecular Structures. Nature 478, 364 (2011).Lee, B.-Y., Zheng, J., Zueger, C., Chung, W.-J., Yoo, S.-Y., Wang, E., Meyer, J., Ramesh, R., Lee, S.-W., Virus-based Piezoelectric Energy Generation. Nature Nanotechnology. 7, 351 (2012).Oh, J.-W., Chung, W.-J., Heo, K, Jin, H.-E., Lee, B.-Y., Wang E., Meyer, J., Kim C., Lee, S.-Y., Kim, W.-G., Zemla, M, Auer, M , Hexemer, A, and Lee, S.-W., Biomimetic Virus-Based Colourimetric Sensors, Nature Communication 5, Article number: 3043 (2014). [more]

May PhD and Postdoc seminar

May PhD and Postdoc seminar

Bioimaging Seminar with Holger Lorenz (ZMBH)

Bioimaging Seminar with Holger Lorenz (ZMBH)

July PhD and Postdoc Seminar

July PhD and Postdoc Seminar

Rudolf Mößbauer Colloquium with Paul Nealey (University of Chicago)

Rudolf Mößbauer Colloquium with Paul Nealey (University of Chicago)
Ion transport in block copolymer electrolytesIon conducting polymers play a central role in the development of safer and more efficient electrochemical devices such as batteries, fuel cells, and electrolyzers. Self-assembling polymeric materials with multiple components offer pathways to simultaneously optimize more than one material function, as well as control structure at the nanoscale. In the first part of my talk, I will highlight the advantages and new information that can be derived from the use of custom microfabricated interdigitated electrodes (IDEs) as a platform to probe extrinsic and intrinsic transport properties of polymer electrolytes films through electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The second part of my talk will address the use block copolymer electrolytes (BCEs) as ion conducting membranes. BCEs provide the means to realize high ionic conductivity and mechanical robustness by judicious choice of block chemistry. To understand the potential of these materials, however, transport properties through BCEs, with domain structure at the nanoscale, must be understood at a fundamental level at the device scale, 10s to 100s of microns. Extrinsic properties of BCEs depend strongly on the presence of grain boundaries and defects. Conductivity is found to be directly proportional to the number and length of domains of the BCE that are connected from one electrode to the other. Any conducting domain within the film impeded with even a single non-conducting defect (e.g. a dislocation) does not contribute to the conductivity and increases the capacitance of the material. Finally, by completely aligning and connecting the conductive domains between electrodes, we can quantitatively investigate the intrinsic transport properties of BCEs and compare them to their homopolymer analogs. We conclude that the interfacial mixing between the blocks at domain interfaces is the dominant factor in reducing ionic mobility in BCEs, reducing the expected conductivity based on volume fraction by as much a factor of 2. [more]

September PhD/Postdoc Seminar

September PhD/Postdoc Seminar

Departmental Seminar with Prof. Dr. Dietmar Hutmacher (QUT)

Departmental Seminar with Prof. Dr. Dietmar Hutmacher (QUT)
Title of the Talk: Humanized Mice Models – State of the Field and Future Perspectives [more]

Proposal Writing (Workshop)

Proposal Writing (Workshop)

Time and Stress Management for Scientists (Workshop)

Time and Stress Management for Scientists (Workshop)

Rudolf Mößbauer Colloquium with Steven Benner (FfAME) - Synthesizing Darwinism from the Bottom Up

Rudolf Mößbauer Colloquium with Steven Benner (FfAME) - Synthesizing Darwinism from the Bottom Up
Title: Synthesizing Darwinism from the Bottom Up Abstract: By pursuing a “grand challenge” goal, synthesis forces scientists across uncharted terrain where they encounter unscripted problems that they must solve using available theory. When the theory is inadequate, the synthesis fails, in a way that cannot be ignored. Thus, grand challenge synthesis drives discovery and paradigm change in ways that observation, analysis, and hypothesis-directed work cannot. This talk will describe our efforts to re-create Darwinism, the archetypal behavior that distinguishes the living state from the nonliving state. It will focus on discoveries and understanding that emerged as we attempted to re-create this central property of living systems on a molecular platform different from what prebiotic chemistry and natural evolution over 4 billion years have produced on Earth. [more]

October PhD/Postdoc Seminar

October PhD/Postdoc Seminar

Rudolf Mößbauer Colloquium with Barbara Imperiali (MIT) - Protein glycosylation: pathways and processes

Rudolf Mößbauer Colloquium with Barbara Imperiali (MIT) - Protein glycosylation: pathways and processes
Complex multistep biosynthetic pathways that afford asparagine-linked (N-linked) glycoproteins occur in all domains of life. The extremely varied and critical functions of N-linked glycosylation in mammalian biology makes this process of significant importance in human health and disease and also of great relevance in medicine and biotechnology as protein therapeutics have become important elements in the modern pharmacopoeia. N-linked glycosylation also occurs in prokaryotes, and, although many important details remain to be explored, it is now clear that there are key differences between the pathways and the resultant glycoprotein functions relative to the well-understood eukaryotic processes. For example, prokaryotic N-linked glycoproteins integrate a far greater diversity of carbohydrate building blocks and glycosidic linkages, relative to their eukaryotic counterparts. Therefore, there is considerable interest the development of chemical biology tools to provide insight into this phenomenon and its functional consequences. In this context, bacterial glycoproteins produced through membrane-associated pathways are implicated in host-pathogen interactions and are displayed on bacterial cell surfaces as virulence factors. Additionally, while multistep N-linked protein glycosylation pathways characterized to date feature glycan assembly at the bilayer interface on linear polyprenol phosphates, there are intriguing differences in the identities of the polyprenols and the physical and biological roles of these unusual terpenes. This presentation will discuss themes reflected in our current research on N-linked protein glycosylation. I will compare and contrast the structures and functions of key enzymes in the N-glycosylation pathways across domains of life and highlight enzymatic steps in Gram-negative pathogens that are critical for virulence and pathogenicity in human hosts. In addition, I will present approaches for investigation of multienzyme complexes in liponanoparticles ultimately targeted at understanding the role of lipids in protein-protein interactions at membrane interfaces. [more]

CBP Departmental Seminar with Andreas Deutsch (TU Darmstadt) on 'Cellular automaton models for the analysis of collective effects in cancer invasion'

CBP Departmental Seminar with Andreas Deutsch (TU Darmstadt) on 'Cellular automaton models for the analysis of collective effects in cancer invasion'
Cancer invasion may be viewed as collective phenomenon emerging from the interplay of individual biological cells with their environment. Cell-based mathematical models can be used to decipher the rules of interaction. In these models cells are regarded as separate movable units. Here, we introduce an integrative modelling approach based on mesoscopic biological lattice-gas cellular automata (BIO-LGCA) to analyse collective effects in cancer invasion. This approach is rule- and cell-based, computationally efficient, and integrates statistical and biophysical models for different levels of biological knowledge. In particular, we provide BIO-LGCA models to analyse mechanisms of invasion in glioma and breast cancer cell lines. [more]

HOTTOP seminar series

HOTTOP seminar series

BMM Departmental Seminar with Visiting Prof. Jeffrey L. Blanchard on ' Giant Viruses, Chlamydia, Vampire Bacteria and the Unexpected Diversity in Soil Microbial Life at Harvard Forest'

BMM Departmental Seminar with Visiting Prof. Jeffrey L. Blanchard on ' Giant Viruses, Chlamydia, Vampire Bacteria and the Unexpected Diversity in Soil Microbial Life at Harvard Forest'
The Harvard Forest Long Term Ecological Research site in Petersham, MA is home to long-term experimental soil warming sites heated continuously to 5° C above ambient temperature since 1991 (Prospect Hill), 2003 (Barre Woods) and 2006 (SWaN). The net short-term effect of warming on forest soil communities is increased microbial activity, which translates to increased CO2 flux to the atmosphere and lower soil organic carbon levels. Several challenges remain to directly link soil communities to changes in soil CO2 efflux. Consequently, it is essential that we develop alternative methods for analyzing community composition and function of active community members. Cells were labeled using SYBR green and separated by fluorescence activated cell sorting. To improve cost efficiency and throughput over single cells genomic methods, 360 subpools of 100 cells each were sequenced. This approach, termed mini-metagenomics, resulted in ~2,000 distinct genome bins. Phylogenomic analysis revealed a surprising diversity of microbial life. Sixteen new lineages of giant viruses were discovered for the first time in a forest soil ecosystem. Intracellular and host-dependent bacteria (Chlamydiae, Legionellales, Bacteriodetes, Rickettsiales and TM6/Dependentiae) were enriched in the data set relative to abundances in our traditional metagenomics data set of DNA extracted directly from the soil and further over-represented among high quality genome bins. Among the bins were several relatives of unusual parasitic vampire bacteria. This collection of mini-MAGs exposes a reservoir of genetic diversity in difficult to cultivate organisms, some of which are related to human pathogens. [more]

HOTTOP seminar series

HOTTOP seminar series

ON Departmental Seminar with Frank Biedermann (KIT) on 'Supramolecular Sensing Ensembles: More Information through Communication'

ON Departmental Seminar with Frank Biedermann (KIT) on 'Supramolecular Sensing Ensembles: More Information through Communication'
The detection of spectroscopically silent analytes in water is often accomplished by utilization of reactive probes that form chromophoric analyte-dye conjugates. Unfortunately, similar but distinctly different analytes usually do not provide unique spectroscopic features, such that chromatographic separation steps have to be employed, causing significant additional costs and hinder applications. Supramolecular indicator-dye displacement assays can overcome certain limitations of reactive-probes, e.g., they allow for an in situ detection of even non-functionalizable analytes and are of great utility for reaction monitoring. However, their analyte differentiation capabilities are again restricted. Here, we present new strategies involving supramolecular sensing ensembles that allow for improved analyte differentiation through spectroscopic fingerprints. We show that this strategy is applicable to both non-covalent analyte-receptor binding schemes and to reactive-probe assays. As opposed to contemporary sensing strategies, our approach capitalizes on induced spectroscopic changes that are resulting from, (A) the direct “communication” of the analyte with a suitable reporter dye in a confined receptor cavity, or (B) from the analyte-induced structural changes of supramolecular dye-aggregates, leading to an altered dye-dye “communication”. [more]

BMM Departmental Seminar with Curtis Suttle (University of British Columbia) on 'Viruses - Unlocking Secrets of the Most Abundant 'Life' on Earth'

BMM Departmental Seminar with Curtis Suttle (University of British Columbia) on 'Viruses - Unlocking Secrets of the Most Abundant 'Life' on Earth'

HOTTOP seminar series

HOTTOP seminar series

Rudolf Mößbauer Colloquium with Andrea Musacchio (MPI of Molecular Physiology) - The kinetochore: the ultimate divisive machine

Rudolf Mößbauer Colloquium with Andrea Musacchio (MPI of Molecular Physiology)
During mitotic cell division, each daughter cell receives from its mother cell an exact, full copy of the genome. For this to happen, the sister chromatids in the mother cell must bi-orient on the mitotic spindle. Sister chromatid separation at the metaphase-to-anaphase transition then leads to equal segregation of the genome to the two daughters. Chromosome attachment to spindle microtubules takes place at complex protein structures named kinetochores, which contain multiple copies of as many as ~30 individual core subunits. This stable protein core emerges from a specialized region of the chromosome known as the centromere. Microtubule binding by kinetochores is subject to a feedback control mechanism known as error correction (ER), and whose purpose is to detect improper configurations of the attachments and allow their regression. This mechanism is believed to require a force sensor capable of monitoring differences in the action of forces acting on kinetochores when they are bi-oriented (correct attachments) or not (incorrect attachment). The molecular nature of this force sensor remains unclear. In addition, kinetochores determine the timing of mitotic exit by exercising control over the cell cycle machinery through the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC). The SAC coordinates completion of bi-orientation with the transition to anaphase, preventing premature mitotic exit in the presence of incompletely attached sister chromatid pairs. All SAC components are recruited to kinetochores and regulated there in a way that reflects attachment status but that remains poorly understood. In the last several years, our laboratory engaged in the in vitro reconstitution and in the structural and functional characterization of several kinetochore sub-complexes that operate at the interface between chromatin and microtubules. We also reconstituted crucial aspects of SAC signalling, identifying a rate-limiting step in the pathway, as well as a set of catalysts that accelerate the accumulation of the checkpoint effector, the mitotic checkpoint complex (MCC). Our current efforts aim to unravel the role of kinetochores in SAC signalling, using reconstituted material as our entry point in the investigation. I will report on the conceptual challenges associated with this idea, as well as on our recent experimental progress. [more]

November PhD/Postdoc Seminar with Petra Schwille

November PhD/Postdoc Seminar with Petra Schwille

Open Lecture with Simon Moroney (Former CEO of MorphoSys), The MorphoSys Story: From Concept to Fully-integrated Biopharma Company

Open Lecture with Simon Moroney (Former CEO of MorphoSys), The MorphoSys Story: From Concept to Fully-integrated Biopharma Company
Dr. Moroney is one of the Company’s co-founders. Prior to that, Dr. Moroney held positions in the Department of Pharmacology, University of Cambridge, UK, as Assistant Professor in the Chemistry Department of the University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada, and as Associate in the Chemistry Department of the ETH in Zurich, Switzerland, where he also held a position as Lecturer. He was an Associate in the Harvard Medical School, Boston, USA, and an employee of ImmunoGen Inc., where he worked on the first generation of anti-cancer antibody conjugates. Dr. Moroney studied chemistry in his native New Zealand, where he completed an MSc with 1st class honors and was a Commonwealth Scholar to the University of Oxford, where he was awarded a D.Phil. in Chemistry. In 2002, Dr. Moroney received the German Cross of the Order of Merit by Dr. Johannes Rau, President of the Federal Republic of Germany, for his services to the biotechnology industry. In 2009, Dr. Moroney was awarded with the Bavarian State Medal for Outstanding Services for his contributions to the Bavarian biotechnology sector and the Bavarian economy. [more]

Rudolf Mößbauer Colloquium with Sarah O'Connor (MPI for Chemical Ecology) - Harnessing the chemistry of plants

Rudolf Mößbauer Colloquium with Sarah O'Connor (MPI for Chemical Ecology)
Plants, which make thousands of complex molecules, are outstanding chemists. The molecules that plants synthesize often have powerful biological activity and many are used as drugs. For example, vincristine (anti-cancer), taxol (anti-cancer), morphine (anti-pain), and artemisinin (anti-malarial) are all produced by plants. Our research group studies how plants synthesize these molecules and we try to use this knowledge to make these compounds more available and more effective. We study a variety of different plants and molecules. Two recent examples are the anti-cancer agent vinblastine, and the insect repellent (and active ingredient of catnip) nepetalactone. [more]

HOTTOP seminar series

HOTTOP seminar series

CB Departmental Seminar with Bruno Correia (EPFL) on 'Computational Design of Functional Proteins for Biomedicine and Synthetic Biology'

CB Departmental Seminar with Bruno Correia (EPFL) on 'Computational Design of Functional Proteins for Biomedicine and Synthetic Biology'

HOTTOP seminar series

HOTTOP seminar series

CB Departmental Seminar with Richard Wombacher (IPMB) on 'Protein Labelling and -Manipulation in Living Cells Using Bioorthogonal Chemistry'

CB Departmental Seminar with Richard Wombacher (IPMB) on 'Protein Labelling and -Manipulation in Living Cells Using Bioorthogonal Chemistry'

HOTTOP seminar series

HOTTOP seminar series

HOTTOP seminar series

HOTTOP seminar series

HOTTOP seminar series

HOTTOP seminar series

HOTTOP seminar series

HOTTOP seminar series

HOTTOP seminar series

HOTTOP seminar series

CANCELLED: Rudolf Mößbauer Colloquium with Prisca Liberali (FMI for Biomedical Research)

Rudolf Mößbauer Colloquium with Prisca Liberali (FMI for Biomedical Research)

HOTTOP seminar series

HOTTOP seminar series

HOTTOP seminar series

HOTTOP seminar series

Rudolf Mößbauer Colloquium with Pablo Rivera Fuentes (EPFL) on 'Molecular switches for single-molecule imaging in live cells'

Rudolf Mößbauer Colloquium with Pablo Rivera Fuentes (EPFL) on 'Molecular switches for single-molecule imaging in live cells'

HOTTOP seminar series

HOTTOP seminar series

Mentale Strategien für Promovierende - Kick-off

Mentale Strategien für Promovierende - Kick-off

Workshop Project Management for PhD students and postdocs

Workshop Project Management for PhD students and postdocs

HOTTOP seminar series

HOTTOP seminar series

HOTTOP seminar series

HOTTOP seminar series

HOTTOP seminar series

HOTTOP seminar series

HOTTOP seminar series

HOTTOP seminar series

HOTTOP seminar series

HOTTOP seminar series

HOTTOP seminar series

HOTTOP seminar series

HOTTOP seminar series

HOTTOP seminar series

CANCELLED - Rudolf Mößbauer Colloquium with Theresa Guise (Indiana University)

CANCELLED - Rudolf Mößbauer Colloquium with Theresa Guise (Indiana University)

Workshop Conflict Management

Workshop Conflict Management

PhD/Postdoc Seminar with Raphaël Rodriguez

PhD/Postdoc Seminar with Raphaël Rodriguez

HOTTOP seminar series

HOTTOP seminar series

HOTTOP seminar series

HOTTOP seminar series

Rudolf Mößbauer Colloquium with Dan S. Tawfik (Weizmann Institute of Science)

Rudolf Mößbauer Colloquium with Dan S. Tawfik (Weizmann Institute of Science)

90 Jahre MPI für medizinische Forschung - Institutsjubiläum

90 Jahre MPI für medizinische Forschung - Institutsjubiläum

HOTTOP seminar series

HOTTOP seminar series

HOTTOP seminar series

HOTTOP seminar series

HOTTOP seminar series

HOTTOP seminar series

Rudolf Mößbauer Colloquium with Young-Tae Chang (POSTECH)

Rudolf Mößbauer Colloquium with Young-Tae Chang (POSTECH)

HOTTOP seminar series

HOTTOP seminar series

HOTTOP seminar series

HOTTOP seminar series

HOTTOP seminar series

HOTTOP seminar series

HOTTOP seminar series

HOTTOP seminar series

Workshop Project Management - online

Workshop Project Management - online

Workshop CV/Interview Training for PhD students - online, part 1

Workshop CV/Interview Training for PhD students - online

HOTTOP seminar series

HOTTOP seminar series

Workshop CV/Interview Training for PhD students - online, part 2

Workshop CV/Interview Training for PhD students - online, part 2
  • Start: Sep 21, 2020 09:30
  • End: Sep 22, 2020 12:30

HOTTOP seminar series

HOTTOP seminar series

PhD/Postdoc Seminar with Tobias Maier (NaWik) on Science Communication

PhD/Postdoc Seminar with Tobias Maier (NaWik) on Science Communication
  • Date: Sep 23, 2020
  • Time: 16:30 - 18:00

HOTTOP seminar series

HOTTOP seminar series

Meyerhof Lecture with Jason Chin (MRC, Cambridge) - MOVED to October 4th, 2021

Meyerhof Lecture with Jason Chin (MRC, Cambridge) - MOVED to October 4th, 2021

Workshop Effective Visual Communication of Science

Workshop Effective Visual Communication of Science

HOTTOP seminar series

HOTTOP seminar series

HOTTOP seminar series

HOTTOP seminar series
  • Date: Oct 19, 2020
  • Time: 15:00 - 16:00
  • Location: virtual

Open Rudolf Mößbauer Colloquium with Ben Schuler (UZH) -Virtual Format

Open Rudolf Mößbauer Colloquium with Ben Schuler (UZH) -Virtual Format
Registration is needed via: https://us02web.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_EvffoGObR-qB1FqFaKnxqA [more]

Workshop Conflict Management

Workshop Conflict Management

HOTTOP seminar series

HOTTOP seminar series

HOTTOP seminar series

HOTTOP seminar series

HOTTOP seminar series

HOTTOP seminar series
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